Search Result(s)

The Origins of the Third World Markets, States and Climate

Essay -very good by The Corner House and the amazing late author and researcher William Blum on the origin of the current geopolitical situation in the past. To understand the disparities of nations today people must understand both the past, and the present.

The Scramble for Africa

A previous "gold rush" or "land grab" structurally similar to GATS and its global grab of today Exploration of Africa Scramble for Africa Part of a series on New Imperialism "The Rhodes Colossus" (1892) by Edward Linley Sambourne History Western imperialism in Asia "The Great Game" The "Scramble for Africa" Historiography of the British Empire Theory The Expansion of England Gentlemanly capitalism The Imperialism of Free Trade Imperialism: A Study Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism Porter–MacKenzie debate See also ImperialismColonialism Decolonization Areas of Africa controlled by European colonial powers (Belgian, British, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish Empires) The Scramble for Africa, also called the Partition of Africa, Conquest of Africa, or the Rape of Africa,[1][2][3] was the invasion, occupation, division, and colonization of most of Africa by a handful of European powers during a short period known to historians as the New Imperialism (between 1881 and 1914). The 10 percent of Africa that was under formal European control in 1870 increased to almost 90 percent by 1914, with only Ethiopia (Abyssinia) and Liberia remaining independent. The Berlin Conference of 1884, which regulated European colonization and trade in Africa, is usually referred to as the starting point of the Scramble for Africa.[4] There were considerable political and economic rivalries among the European empires in the last quarter of the 19th century. Partitioning Africa was effected largely without Europeans going to war.[5] In the later years of the 19th century, the European nations transitioned from "informal imperialism" — i.e., exercising military influence and economic dominance — to direct rule, bringing about colonial imperialism.