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‘Fair workweek’ laws help more than 1.8 million US workers

Laws promote workplace flexibility and protect against unfair scheduling practices. (These, along with US wage laws requiring "minimum wages" be paid and work visas be sought, are among the kinds of laws that foreign firms feel discriminate unfairly against them and their workers, since they don't offer them such flexibilities while they are working at home.) Suppose India wins their case, and the number of such employers and employees skyrockets. Will such laws have to be eliminated? Or will they simply not apply to foreign firms, giving *them* an unfair advantage? That seems to be okay in the WTO's eyes, by the way. Since its allegedly the repayment of a debt we now owe, which materialized in the 1990s.

Inside America's woefully ill-prepared health system

"by Jacob Greber: The US healthcare system, so expensive that people actively avoid hospitals, could become the defining political issue of a presidential election year." "One American every 30 seconds is bankrupted by medical bills."

A Cautionary Tale for David Brooks and Others What, really, was Jim Cooper’s ‘Clinton Lite?’

It should be noted that the GATS negotiations - part of the Uruguay Round, which "made services tradable", and took them off the table as something domestic regulations are supposed to be able to change, were wrapping up at the same time this was all going on. Making it qualify as something other than a "debate" over future policy. Instead, its more of a simulacrum. This is still the case today, one should understand. Still, its all worth reading. Note: There is a companion article to this one, which can be found at (Use archive.org) https://web.archive.org/web/20080607133503/http://backissues.cjrarchives.org/year/94/2/clinton.asp

American Health Care Horror Stories: An Incomplete Inventory

The statistics demonstrating the scope of our nation’s healthcare crisis are appalling enough. Two of three Americans report skipping needed care each year due to cost, including not filling prescriptions or putting off doctor visits. Millions are forced to borrow money to pay medical bills, leading to crushing debt. Others can’t get the care they need even by borrowing, and suffer fatal consequences: physician researchers estimate tens of thousands of Americans die each year due to inability to afford care.

US involvement in India demonetization - Big US companies behind the Indian "cashless cities " movement.

One worry I have though is, what happens if there is a strong solar storm, which could wipe out the energy grid and also, telecommunications for some time. (possibly years, as transformers that carry electricity are expensive, manufacturing capacity is limited, and they are difficult to replace) Another risk is multiple nuclear meltdowns due to loss of the ultimate heatsink. Cashless could mean no way to purchase food for an extended period of time.