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US has potential of becoming coronavirus epicentre, says WHO

WHO spokeswoman Margaret Harris said in Geneva there had been a "very large acceleration" in coronavirus infections in the United States which had the potential of becoming the new epicenter. Over the past 24 hours, 85 percent of new cases were from Europe and the United States, she told reporters. Of those, 40 percent were from the United States. Asked whether the United States could become the new epicenter, Harris said: "We are now seeing a very large acceleration in cases in the U.S. So it does have that potential. We cannot say that is the case yet but it does have that potential." ------------------------------------------- (Source: VOA https://www.voanews.com/science-health/coronavirus-outbreak/us-could-become-coronavirus-epicenter-who-says )

Avoiding coronavirus may be a luxury some US workers can't afford

Stay home from work if you get sick. See a doctor. Use a separate bathroom from the people you live with. Prepare for schools to close and to work from home. These are measures the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended to slow a coronavirus outbreak in the United States. Yet these are much easier to do for certain people — in particular, high-earning professionals. Service industry workers — like those in restaurants, retail, child care and the gig economy — are much less likely to have paid sick days, the ability to work remotely or employer-provided health insurance. The disparity could make the new coronavirus, which causes a respiratory illness known as COVID-19, harder to contain in the U.S. than in other rich countries that have universal benefits like health care and sick leave, experts say. A large segment of workers are not able to stay home, and many of them work in jobs that include high contact with other people. It could also mean that low-income workers are hit harder by the virus.

Health for some: death, disease and disparity in a globalizing era

By R Labonte, T Schrecker, AS Gupta. These vignettes show how recent, rapid changes in our global economy can imperil the health of millions. The first describes a real event. 1 The other three are composites, like those used in the World Bank's World Development Report 1995 (World Bank 1995), but in …