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The Trojan Horse of e-commerce.

The Trojan Horse of e-Commerce Professor Jane Kelsey (University of Auckland) Intellectual Property and Trade in the Pacific Century Brisbane, 22 June 2017 QUT Intellectual Property and Innovation Law Research Program The comprehensive chapter on electronic commerce in the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) heralded a game changer in the negotiation of international rules. The benign chapter heading belies a fundamental rewriting of the international trade rules to serve the rapid growth of digital economy, controlled by a powerful oligopoly of mega-corporations. Their stated goal is to achieve global rules that protect them from national regulation of their activities for the indefinite future. The TPP text has since been tabled in the Trade in Services Agreement (TISA) negotiations and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), judging by a leaked list of the headings of articles in the e-commerce chapter. If adopted, these rules would impose huge and unforeseeable fetters on the sovereignty of governments to regulate their economies, and address related issues of privacy, security and consumer protection. The cross-fertilisation of the e-commerce chapters with others on cross-border services, financial services, telecommunications and transparency would create a regime of unprecedented constraints and complexity that even advanced countries in RCEP would struggle to implement them, let alone the developing and least developed country parties in the RCEP.

Australian government has failed to learn from Robodebt fiasco, new tender seems to be returning to failed policies and targets."Privatising debt collection exposes people to companies who are not accountable"

Critics of the (Australian) Federal Government's botched Robodebt system fear Centrelink's new debt collectors have failed to learn from the mistakes of the unlawful recovery program. Key points: ## Centrelink's new debt collectors will be incentivised to compete with each other ## Those collecting more will win increased work, others will be penalised ## Settling the failed 'Robodebt' scheme cost the Government $1.2 billion ## Tender documents reveal a panel of new collection agencies must continuously compete to beat rigorous financial targets for recovering money from customers: either winning more work or facing penalties. Australian Unemployed Workers Union spokeswoman Kristin O'Connell said she was surprised the department was going to outsource the work. "As the Government's own documents acknowledge, this outsourcing model means debt collectors have incentives that can result in 'unintended and perverse' behaviour to meet targets and trigger fees," Ms O'Connell said.

Advancing the Odious Debt Doctrine

by Ashfaq Khalfan, Jeff King and Bryan Thomas. McGill University legal scholars have completed an investigation into the Doctrine of Odious Debts, and concluded that it is both "morally compelling" and "relatively well supported under international law". Centre for International Sustainable Development Law (CISDL), Montreal, March 11/2003

Plan B: Declaration For a Democratic Rebellion in Europe

Democratic Europeans are fighting back against state capture: "A movement to place human rights, civil, political, social, economic, cultural and democratic rights, at the heart of the european project, as an intrinsic part of democracy."