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Discussions of Intellectual Property and Health Care "To see the collection of prior postings to the list, visit the Ip-health Archives." This is one of the very best places to learn about the battle -access to medicines vs drug patents and the drug cartel. If you saw the film "Fire in the Blood" you saw how, in this era of global epidemics and corporate greed people must stand up for the rights of human beings to lifesaving drugs at affordable and not extortionate prices. This URL brings one straight to the list archives.

FIRE IN THE BLOOD Preview Clip #1: Thematic Overview

FIRE IN THE BLOOD: http://www.fireintheblood.com https://www.facebook.com/fireintheblood Sundance Film Festival Official Selection 2013 A shocking exposé of how pharmaceutical companies use patent law to keep profits unconscionably high even at the expense of peoples' lives, and a plea for universal access to affordable, life-saving generic medicines. An intricate tale of "medicine, monopoly and malice", FIRE IN THE BLOOD tells the story of how Western pharmaceutical companies and governments aggressively blocked access to affordable AIDS drugs for the countries of Africa and the global south in the years after 1996 - causing ten million or more unnecessary deaths. It is also the inspiring story of the improbable group of people who decided to fight back. Shot on four continents and including contributions from global figures such as President Bill Clinton, Bishop Desmond Tutu and economist Joseph Stiglitz, FIRE IN THE BLOOD is the never-before-told true story of the remarkable coalition which came together to stop 'the Crime of the Century' and save millions of lives.

"Fire in the Blood": Millions Die in Africa After Big Pharma Blocks Imports of Generic AIDS Drugs (Democracy Now)

(From Democracy Now) The new documentary, "Fire in the Blood," examines how millions have died from AIDS because big pharmaceutical companies and the United States have refused to allow developing nations to import life-saving generic drugs. The problem continues today as the World Trade Organization continues to block the importation of generic drugs in many countries because of a trade deal known as the Trips Agreement. We're joined by the film's director, Dylan Mohan Gray, and Ugandan AIDS doctor Peter Mugyenyi, who was arrested for trying to import generic drugs, and is

Access to Medicines: Panel Discussion at Georgetown University about the "Crime of the Century" the disastrous murder by drug prices, of millions shown and discussed in the award winning film, Fire in the Blood

Doctors Without Borders and the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University screen (the 2013 film) Fire in the Blood and a discussion of challenges and opportunities for access to medicines, featuring a panel of distinguished speakers representing a range of expertise in the field of access to medicines.

Our right to regulate drug prices was signed away when we joined the WTO.

The TRIPS agreement is part of the WTO. It was meant to jack up the prices of drugs all around the world. GATS (another WTO agreement) gave countries another bargaining chip they could use, jobs. . A logical approach would be for us to dump both GATS and TRIPS at the same time. That would give the poor countries (And US) back our right to regulate prices and get affordable drugs, we could keep the potentially millions of jobs that could end up being traded away in GATS. We would also get back our right to have affordable healthcare, and prevent Medicare and Social Security from being privatized.

Indian Company Offers to Supply AIDS Drugs at Low Cost in Africa (New York Times, Feb. 7, 2001)

(This is the story depicted in the Fire in the Blood film) By Donald G. McNeil Jr. In a move that could force big drug multinationals to cut the prices of their AIDS drugs in poor countries, an Indian company offered today to supply triple-therapy drug ''cocktails'' for $350 a year per patient to a doctors' group working in Africa. The Indian company, Cipla Ltd. of Bombay, a major manufacturer of generic drugs, made the offer to Doctors Without Borders, which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1999 for its work in war-torn and impoverished areas. In Africa the group sets up small pilot programs to develop models for broader approaches to combat AIDS, and would distribute the Cipla drugs free. As part of its program, Cipla would also sell the drugs to larger government programs for $600 a year per patient, about $400 below the price offered by the companies that hold the patents. ''This is the way to break the stranglehold of the multinationals,'' said Dr. Yusuf K. Hamied, chairman of Cipla, who will meet with the doctors' group on Feb. 15 to discuss strategy. For two years, Doctors Without Borders has led an aggressive campaign to force multinationals to cut prices on life-saving drugs for the world's poorest patients. Other parties in the campaign are the Philadelphia and Paris chapters of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, and the Consumer Project on Technology, a Washington group started by Ralph Nader. The normal cost of the AIDS cocktail in the West is $10,000 to $15,000 a year. Last May five multinationals, backed by the World Health Organization and other United Nations agencies, offered to sell their components to poor nations at sharply reduced prices. But Cipla and other makers of generic drugs in Brazil, Thailand and other countries have not been part of the talks with W.H.O., a situation that Cipla hopes to change with its aggressive entry onto the scene. The country-by-country negotiations about how the multinationals distribute the drugs have gone slowly, and so far only Uganda, Senegal and Rwanda have agreements. The companies refuse to release figures, but the cost of a typical cocktail in Senegal is $1,000 a year, according to Doctors Without Borders. Dr. Bernard Pecoul, director of the Access to Essential Medicines project for Doctors Without Borders, said the Cipla offer, which he learned of only today, ''will let us start up our pilot projects on a larger scale.'' The doctors' group has 40 AIDS projects around the world, about half in Africa, where the infection rate reaches as high as 36 percent. Only five of these pilot programs are giving out antiretroviral cocktails. With the Cipla offer, or matching ones from other companies, up to 20 could be distributing the drugs by the end of year. Cipla is offering to sell the agency as many doses as it is wants at $350 a year. Dr. Hamied said that his company would lose money at that price, but that he would supply ''10,000 doses or 20,000 or 30,000, however many they want.'' The $600 price to governments is near Cipla's break-even point, he said, but costs could drop with greater production. If that happens, he would cut prices further. In India he sells the same cocktail for about $1,100 a year. But he denied that he was trying to grab market share in Africa. ''What do I want with market share?'' he asked. ''I don't have a monopoly, and the only way to make real money in drugs is with a monopoly. In this disaster, there is room for everybody.'' Wide distribution of the drugs in Africa is not without critics, given the attendant need for careful monitoring. Some experts argue that it would be better to spend the money on providing clean water, controlling malaria and increasing the use of condoms. But Doctors Without Borders says that the dangers and side effects of the drugs pale beside the immensity of the epidemic itself, and that Western testing standards are overcautious. The typical AIDS cocktail is a combination of any three of about nine protease inhibitors or reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The chemicals suppress the human immunodeficiency virus but, as with any chemical therapy, they are toxic and can damage the liver. In the West, doctors carefully monitor the levels of the drug in the blood, test for organ damage and check the levels of the virus in the bloodstream. If the virus mutates to resist the therapy, the combinations are changed. Careful monitoring may not be possible in many African settings. But with 25 million Africans infected with the AIDS virus, Doctors Without Borders and other agencies argue, imperfect treatment is better than none. Dr. Pecoul pointed out that large numbers of infected Africans live in urban areas where, ''with a quite simple clinic, you can deal with anti retrovirals.'' He is also ''not convinced'' that the batteries of tests routinely ordered for Western patients are really necessary. ''Some people suggest that H.I.V. testing and clinical followup can be enough,'' he added. The Cipla drug combination is two tablets of 40 milligrams of stavudine, two tablets of 150 milligrams of lamivudine and two tablets of 200 milligrams of nevirapine. In the United States and many other countries, the Bristol-Myers Squibb Company holds the patent on stavudine, also known as Zerit or d4T; Glaxo-Wellcome of Britain holds the patent on lamivudine, also known as Heptovir or 3TC, and Boerhinger Ingelheim G.m.b.H. of Germany holds the patent on nevirapine, or Viramune. Western drug companies have shown themselves determined to defend their patent rights to be sole distributors throughout the world, and Dr. John Wecker, head of Boerhinger Ingelheim's efforts to negotiate cheaper prices in Africa, said he did not yet know what his company would do if Cipla undercut its prices. ''We offer a standard quality from the original manufacturer and can meet any demand that exists out there that can be delivered with safe procedures,'' he said. He refused repeatedly to say at what price Boerhinger Ingelheim sells nevirapine to Senegal or Uganda, saying, ''Affordability is an issue, but not the major issue.'' Representatives from Glaxo-Wellcome and Bristol-Myers did not return phone calls, but the three companies can be expected to wage a hard fight against the distribution of generic versions of their drugs. Late last year, Glaxo-Wellcome threatened to sue Cipla when it tried to sell Duovir, its generic version of Glaxo's Combivir, a lamivudine/zidovudine combination, in Ghana. Cipla offered the drug for $1.74 a day; Glaxo had cut its price to $2, from $16. But even though the African regional patent authority said Glaxo's patents were not valid in Ghana, Cipla backed down and stopped selling Duovir. Asked what he would do if the three drug companies sued to stop him, Dr. Hamied said: ''We won't fight it. I don't look at it as a fight. There's room for everybody. This is a holocaust in Africa. It's like the earthquake in India right now -- everybody is helping out. I'm not looking to pick anybody's business; there's room for the multinationals at their price and room for us at our price, a partnership.''